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Activism, Anti-Racism, Dissent and Peaceful Protest: Activism

History of Peaceful Protest and 1st Amendment Rights

Activism --Introduction

Selected Readings--Websites with Booklists related to Activism, Anti-racism and Peaceful Protest

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  • 20 books on race in America

          A good start in understanding anti-racism

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kylewestaway/2020/06/04/20-books-for-2020-a-reading-list-on-race-in-america/#15482b7230b0

  • 16 books on race and white privilege

        From Business insider-16 titles that include discussions on white privilege.

https://www.businessinsider.com/books-white-privilege-novels-racism-antiracism-black-scholars-2020-6

  • 17 books on racial inequality for young readers

        From Vogue and geared to teen and freshmen students- a must reads on activism and anti-racism.

https://www.businessinsider.com/books-white-privilege-novels-racism-antiracism-black-scholars-2020-6

Websites related to Activism

 

Black Past

BlackPast.org brings the resources of African American history into every classroom in the world. It also makes every computer, regardless of its location, a classroom in African American history.

https://www.blackpast.org/about-us/

https://www.blackpast.org/tag/civil-rights-activists/

Center for Constitutional Rights  An organization that stands with social movements and communities resisting oppression, we know that change is possible when artists, storytellers, and lawyers dream together.

https://ccrjustice.org/black-history-month-activism-through-artists-lawyers-and-storytellers

Civil Rights History project—Library of Congress

On May 12, 2009, the U. S. Congress authorized a national initiative by passing The Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-19). The law directed the Library of Congress to conduct a national survey of existing oral history collections with relevance to the Civil Rights movement to obtain justice, freedom and equality for African Americans and to record and make widely accessible new interviews with people who participated in the struggle.

The activists interviewed for this project belong to a wide range of occupations, including lawyers, judges, doctors, farmers, journalists, professors, and musicians, among others. The video recordings of their recollections cover a wide range of topics within the freedom struggle, such as the influence of the labor movement, nonviolence and self-defense, religious faith, music, and the experiences of young activists. Actions and events discussed in the interviews include the Freedom Rides (1961), the Albany Movement (1961), the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963), the Selma to Montgomery Rights March (1965), the Orangeburg Massacre (1968), the Poor People’s Campaign (1968), sit-ins, and voter registration drives in the South.

https://www.loc.gov/collections/civil-rights-history-project/about-this-collection/

Civil Rights Movement

A chronological look at activism and civil rights from the History Channel.

https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/civil-rights-movement

Library of Congress—Youth in the Civil Rights Movement

Reflections about young people in the freedom struggle.

https://www.loc.gov/collections/civil-rights-history-project/articles-and-essays/youth-in-the-civil-rights-movement/